Eloy: Metromania

METROMANIA

Publication And Date Unknown

Written By Mick Wall

“Hard rockers can turn the page right now! Metal intellectuals, stay tuned because this baby is for you. But before you drag out the slide-rule and the pocket calculator I should point out that the Latin of Eloy’s compulsive prog-rock hymns has a tidy measure of good old pop-satin smeared over it’s aquiline features.

“Metromania” does sound a little like an energised version of mid-seventies Pink Floyd, that much is true, with very definite touches of Eighties Yes mixed in to add that digitally recorded sophisticated spice and flavour. However, let’s all agree now that comparisons are ultimately odious and, worse, entirely misleading. Eloy have a musical identity strong and refined enough to carry their own torch across the rock arenas of the Western world.

Opening with “Escape To The Heights,” it’s all burning guitars and saccarine keyboards polished with pop vocal harmonies that sprint along with the youthful panache of a frisky lamb in season. Bound, bound, bound, leap, leap, leap go the rhythm spirals of bass player Klaus Peter Matziol and drummer Fritz Randow, straight into the next track, “Seeds Of Creation”. Again it’s an up-tempo rocker sugar-coated in the melodic, tippy-toe doodlings of the keyboards, courtesy of Hans Filberth.

From here on in we’re starting to stroll through the remote electronic wastelands of Eloy’s complex polychromatic rock vision with “All Life’s One” and “The Stranger”. Lead vocalist/lead guitarist Frank Bornemann is not the kind of frontman to hog the limelight, but when he does step forward he’s as likely to leave his signature in red down the inside of your arm as he is to indelibly scare the brain-plate with his pointed boot heels. We’re talking talent here, people. You heard that word before? Yes? Then add Eloy to the cerebral library list…

Side Two commences with the two longest pieces of orchestral beauty the album has to offer- “Follow The Light” and “Nightriders”. Each clocks in at just over nine minutes and both are worth the wait, the kind of lengthy slogs worth laying out the ackers for it if you wanna mean serious business. Yes, they’re very Floyd in places, ultra Yes in other, but mostly it’s Eloy at it’s very, very best.

Listen to me; there are good people, like Malcolm Dome, who love this kind of music yet harbour hard and steady prejudices against Eloy because so far they’ve heard nothing that impresses them. (Un) Fair enough, maybe. But you listen to “Metromania” and, if you can, tell me this album is not wonderful. Just try it, I’ll eat you alive…”


METROMANIA

Publication And Date Unknown

Writer Unknown

“Talented Teutons Eloy are one of the bands in the vanguard of the campaign to restore “progressive rock” to it’s former pre-eminence in the world market and this skillfully crafted collections should so their cause no harm at all. Metromania is Eloy’s fourth album and leader Frank Bornemann and his cohorst have managed to strike a pretty effective balance.”


METROMANIA

Publication And Date Unknown

Written By Alan Poole

“The German prog-rockers’ fourth album for Heavy Metal shows a distinct change in style from their previous work although the sound is still instantly recognizable as the Eloy of old. It’s packaged in sharper, tighter chunks- there are actually recognisable songs here as opposed to the slabs of conceptual sound we are used to- and they seem to have struck a canny balance between keeping their faithful fans happy and offering a more commercial taste to newcomers. As before, Frank Bornemann’s vocals and guitar provide the cutting edge to the electronic mesh; the album comes complete in a handsomely textured sample of Rodney Matthews artwork; and, for the technically minded, it’s direct metal mastered.”